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Archive for the ‘Workplace Safety’ Category

I Have An Injured Employee: What Are My Responsibilities?

As an employer, you may be responsible for replenishing lost wages if one of your employees suffers a job-related injury. Most of the time, you will also be required to have workers’ compensation insurance, which is designed to pay a portion of your employee’s usual salary during the time in which they are recovering from a work-related illness or injury.

Some types of workers, such as railroad workers and independent contractors, are not covered by workers’ compensation laws. Additionally, employees can also sue their employers (albeit rarely) if they sustain injuries due to health and safety violations in a workplace or from employer negligence in general.

Is your employee’s injury work-related?

If your employee’s injury is truly work-related, meaning it happened during their work duties or performing a task on your organization’s behalf, then they can claim for workers’ compensation, as well as other forms of relief which you should provide for them. Sometimes your employees may even be covered if they have disregarded your workplace safety rules, for example, if they were “messing about” when they should have been working. This is contentious, however, and tends to divide state governments and courthouses across the country.

Generally speaking, to count as work-related, your employee’s injury has to have occurred during an employee’s work hours, which means that their lunch breaks are disregarded unless they spent it on your premises and suffered an injury in that time. Injuries resulting from drunkenness can still be deemed work-related, particularly if they occur during a work-sponsored Christmas party, for example.

If your employee has a pre-existing medical conditioned which is aggravated by working at your business, this also usually constitutes a workplace injury. Similarly, mental conditions can be treated the same as physical conditions if they are determined to have been sustained as a result of your workplace.

Workers’ Compensation Coverage

Most states will require employers to carry workers’ compensation insurance, though it’s worth noting that Wyoming and Idaho don’t require the coverage of undocumented workers. On the other hand, states such as California, Texas, and Arizona include undocumented workers specifically in their coverage of “workers”.

Domestic workers (such as nannies and babysitters), seasonal workers, undocumented workers and agricultural workers may not be deemed “workers” by many states, so be sure to take this into account when reviewing your Workers’ Compensation Coverage.

Employees who fall under the eligibility guidelines can file a claim for benefits, which is usually around two-thirds of their regular salary. However, they are not entitled to sue you for their injuries in court too. Nevertheless, employers must provide the insurance coverage which is required by the laws in their state. If they don’t, they could receive steep fines and legal troubles galore.

Employees who don’t qualify for Workers’ Comp benefits

Employees who are not covered by Workers’ Comp benefits are often still entitled to legal benefits and compensation from you. Independent contractors, for example, may have contracts which stipulate that an arbitrator settles legal disputes between you and them. Occasionally, in rare cases, an employee may try to sue you. However, this requires very specific circumstances, and is not likely to occur.

Employees who aren’t covered by the Workers’ comp agreements have other options available to them legally, such as the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act, the Federal Employment Liability Act, the Merchant Marine Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, and the Black Lung Benefits Act.

As you may have guessed, a lot of these legal acts are very industry-specific, relating to industries such as railroads, maritime business, and mining. Unless your business fits into these industries, it is unlikely that you will have to learn too much about them. Nonetheless, it’s a good idea to check what options your injured employees have available to them, whether they’re covered by your insurance policies or not. It can be incredibly useful to be one step ahead of your injured employees, as it allows you to take precautions and predict the legal actions they may take.

Got an injured employee? Looking for legal advice about what your responsibilities are in this situation? Put your mind at ease today by getting touch with one of our knowledgeable advisors.

Workplace deaths on the rise; injuries/illnesses down

Workplace related deaths are rising as of last year while workplace illnesses have decreased. The top 3 non-fatal injuries being sprains, strains, tears.

There is a need to remain vigilant in protecting workers from death while continuing to also manage workplace safety to maintain overall individual health. Health affects safety and vice versa, so companies should take an integrated approach to enhance both their safety and health management capabilities.

The three most impacted industries for health and safety issues include:

  • Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
  • Manufacturing
  • Health care and social assistance

(The health care/social assistance and manufacturing industries reported more than half (52.7 percent) of all private industry illness)

For workplace deaths, the leading cause by a wide margin is transportation incidents. The second cause is workplace violence… and both are on the rise.

The minorities suffering the largest increase in fatal injuries include Asian and African-American workers. Hispanic or Latino workers have actually seen a slight decrease in fatalities. In addition, foreign-born workers make up about 20% of the total fatal work injuries.

Age also is apparently playing a factor. Workers 55 and older saw a significant increase in fatal injuries when compared with other age groups. (In 1992 they made up about 20% of fatalities. By 2016 it was 36%.)

Steps to take in your company to avoid becoming one of the statistics:

  • Complete a health and safety audit at least once a year. Make sure it identifies factors for high risk of both fatality as well as injury… particularly from musculoskeletal diseases.
  • Be sure workers have a clear understanding of health and safety best practices.
  • Enforce solid health & safety practices and reward employees for finding ways to reduce health and safety risks. (Fear of reporting issues is a huge factor that creates situations leading to injuries and fatalities.)
  • Encourage workers to think about workplace procedures with the mindset “that all ill health and accidents are preventable”.

    Are you looking for more information about workplace safety? Perhaps you have concerns about your own workplace? Get in touch with us today, we can advise you risk management how it relates to your workplace.

Active Shooter Preparedness

Preparing Your Workplace for an Active Shooter

It’s heartbreaking to acknowledge that violence in the workplace occurs. According to the CDC more than 15,000 employees became a workplace homicide victim over the last 20 years. Four-fifths of these injuries were a result of gunfire.

It’s difficult to imagine something like this would occur where you work. Yet nearly half of all shooting incidents take place in commercial locations.

Survivors of active shooting incidents have successfully sued their companies for neglect in not offering defensive training on how to handle such situations. Refusing to address the potential hazards of an energetic shooter in your office might also be a violation of the OSHA Health And Wellness Act.

It’s important to help your staff understand the potential danger of a situation as well as how handle one should it occur.

First, be on the lookout for employees that show signs of:

  • Radical changes in behavior.
  • Aggressive behavior such as yelling, pushing, or intimidating others.
  • Outward aggressive anger toward coworkers or supervisor.
  • Increasing frequency of referencing violent actions.

Encourage your staff to be aware of and report these indications to their supervisor, security or police as required.

You should also ensure your staff knows how to stay safe.

Most active shooter incidents happen quickly and last minutes. You need to train your team to be prepared for potential scenarios, as well as when to leave, shelter, or fight in place as necessary.

Leave– This is the primary way of protection, provided there is an available path to safely escape. Training should include emergency contact processes and how to quickly evacuate facilities.

Shelter– Occasionally escape is not possible. Your staff will need to find a safe hiding area. Places to hide should be out of the active shooter’s line of vision and be very easy to evacuate if the situation changes. Good hiding places allow your team to secure or blockade doors.

Fight– This is a last resort. The key is to distract or incapacitate. Methods can include screaming, hand-to-hand protection strategies, and also improvising weapons.

Finally, you should be sure your team understands how to behave when the authorities show up. When evacuating the building, advise staff to leave personal items behind and keep their hands empty, up, and clearly visible. They also must comply with instructions issued by law enforcement.

And also remember, we’re only a phone call or email away if you have questions about workplace safety and how it impacts your insurance costs.

Do This When Workplace Accidents Happen

Office mishaps happen. They happen regularly and some are severe. OSHA requires employers to take all reasonable actions to protect their personnel from office injuries & work-related health challenges. To comply, it’s vital that you have procedures in place for evaluating accidents that occur.

1. Establish what took place. You’ll need to analyze the scene of the mishap (including any type of equipment utilized during the occurrence), speak to the injured staff member (when possible) as well as collect the accounts of various other workers that witnessed the occurrence. Collect the names of the injured parties, descriptions of the injuries or damage that occurred, and also a timeline of the case.

Questions to Ask:

  • Where did the occurrence take place?
  • What was the employee doing at the time of the accident?
  • Was the employee participating in a brand-new work procedure?
  • Were other employees in the area?
  • Just what were the witnesses doing at the time of the occurrence?
  • What injuries resulted?
  • What damage did the mishap create?

2. Identify why it took place. Office accidents hardly ever happen in a vacuum. Accidents happen typically due to moving too quickly, overconfidence, disregarding security procedures, and also lack of prep work. Examining the details will help you determine the underlying causes.

More Questions to Ask:

  • What are the conditions where the issue occurred?
  • Was the staff member qualified to carry out the job?
  • Was the worker properly trained to perform the operation?
  • Was the employee making use of appropriate tools and equipment?
  • Were these tools/devices in good condition?
  • Did the employee comply with all business safety and security policies?
  • Was the employee receiving appropriate guidance?

3. Establish how you can protect against future mishaps. Leverage a situation to help you discover how to prevent future situations.

Questions to Consider:

  • What short and long-term actions can you take to eliminate such events in the future?
  • Do you have to adjust your work environment safety and security methods to ensure compliance?
  • How do you handle assessing your environment and personnel?

If you would like more info on best practices to handle workplace safety, please contact our insurance team…

5 Workplace Safety Mistakes You Should Avoid At All Costs

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compels employers to ensure that their employees’ working environment and conditions are safe and free of any apparent dangers. Workplace safety inevitably requires strict training and inspections in order to be effective, as well as complete adherence to all the regulations and rules that are set in place. Most workplace accidents and ailments are able to be prevented by following strict protocols and safety plans.

Employers should never ignore their staff taking shortcuts that compromise the health and safety of their day-to-day operations. Cutting corners and ignoring health and safety regulations could lead to hazardous and inevitably life-threatening situations that could negatively affect you and your employees. Below we have highlighted 5 workplace safety mistakes that should be avoided at all costs.

1. Ignoring PPE rules

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be worn throughout the entirety of any tasks that require it. Uncomfortable temperatures or overly-nonchalant attitudes should not excuse employees from wearing their PPE at the appropriate times. Conducting periodic PPE assessments allows you to comprehend the PPE that is necessary for your workers and working environment. It is your responsibility as an employer to ensure that your employees are provided with well-fitting PPE that protects them during their day-to-day duties.

2. Using incorrect tools

Using an incorrect (or makeshift) tool for a job is inevitably hazardous and inefficient. Even if a tool is similar to the appropriate one, it is still not advised to use it. Tools are built for specific applications; forcing tools to do things that they are not designed for is inherently dangerous. Employers should always provide their workers with the appropriate tools to carry out their duties.

3. Skipping routine machine inspections

You should always conduct routine machine inspections, even if a machine seems to be working as it should. Machine breakdowns and maintenance procedures can crop up when you least expect them, so be sure to stick to your scheduled machine inspections. Have certified professionals conduct thorough machine inspections that can alert you to any subtle hazards or problems. Though this may take up your time, having an expected machine breakdown in the middle of a busy day can be catastrophic and dangerous.

4. Refusing to review annual safety guidelines

Your business inevitably changes and evolves over time, and your safety guidelines should evolve too. Reassess your safety guidelines every year and be sure to educate your employees about them regularly. You should ideally train your employees with regards to workplace safety regulations on a regular basis, especially if you make changes and modifications to your facilities or processes. The latest version of your health and safety guidelines should always be available for your workers to peruse.

5. Using ladders instead of scaffolding (and vice versa)

Scaffolds and ladders are not interchangeable; they have their own specific purposes. Swapping either of these pieces of equipment for the other can lead to serious injuries and fatalities. There were over 800 fatalities as a result of falls in 2015; it is of the utmost importance that employees working in elevated areas are provided with robust and appropriate equipment for ascending and descending heights.

Always remain organized and proactive when it comes to workplace safety; an accident will occur when you least expect it. When an accident does happen, following the appropriate health and safety guidelines will allow you to rest assured that your employees are as safe as they can possibly be. It also covers your back in the event of legal proceedings and insurance claims.

We’re always looking out for insurance information that affects your finances and your health too. Get in touch with us 24/7 and we will answer any insurance-related questions you may have.

Top 10 Workplace Safety Guidelines

A safe workplace is a function of how the management and workers of an establishment adhere to and communicate safety standards. Workplace safety is not all about policies and practice guidelines alone.

Strong workplace safety is built around encouraging employees to identify unsafe behaviors and recognize opportunities for improvement. This will help them make well-informed safety decision while discharging their duties.

Below are Top 10 Workplace Safety Guidelines Each Employee Must Know to help you create a safe working environment centered on shared responsibility:

  1. Be Aware of your surroundings: this simply means being aware of the particular hazards associated with your workplace or job. After learning these risks, you will be able to avoid potentially hazardous areas and situations, as well as machinery.
  2. Keep correct posture to protect your back: if you do your job at a desk, ensure to align your shoulders with your hips to avoid backaches. When picking objects up, always bend appropriately so that you don’t hurt your back. Try as much as possible to avoid stooping and twisting. Using safety equipment and ergonomic designed furniture will also ensure that everything you need is within reach so that you don’t have to strain your back when you want to get them.
  3. Go on regular breaks: a majority of injuries and illnesses that occur in the workplace are because a worker is tired and burned out, making him not to be alert to his environment. Going on regular breaks helps a worker stay afresh on the job. A great tip for keeping alert is to schedule the most onerous tasks when your concentration is at its best; after you wake up in the morning.
  4. Use machines and tools properly: always follow proper instructions when using a particular device, avoid taking shortcuts as this is a leading cause of workplace injury. For example, using scaffolding as a ladder, or using a tool in place of another for a particular job is a huge risk. When you use the right tools the right way, you have significantly reduced the chances of workplace injury.
  5. All emergency exits must be easily accessible: you will need to reach the doors quickly and easily in case of an emergency. Also, all roads or entrances leading to equipment must be clear in case you will need to stop them from running during an emergency.
  6. Let your supervisor know about unsafe conditions: did you notice any safety hazards or risks in your workplace? Report them immediately to your supervisor. Legally, they are obligated to make a working environment safe for their employees. So they will take care of any reported unsafe condition to ensure you and your co-workers have a safe working environment.
  7. Use mechanical aids whenever possible: rather than trying to carry or lift a heavy item to save time during your workday, you could take extra time to use a wheelbarrow, crank or forklift, or conveyor belt. A lot of injury risks are associated with lifting heavy objects.
  8. Be sober: Many workplace injuries occur as a result of drugs and alcohol. Drug usage or alcohol consumption can compromise a worker’s ability to exercise judgment, coordination, alertness or concentration, motor control, and could expose him to different workplace injuries and fatalities.
  9. Minimize workplace stress: endeavor to keep workplace stress at it bearest minimum because it can result in lack of concentration or depression. Some examples of the common causes of workplace stress are a heavy workload, long hours, job insecurity, and conflicts with co-workers or managers. Discuss your workplace stress concerns with your supervisor and see if they can help you address them.
  10. Wear the correct personal protective equipment (PPE): a great way to reduce workplace injury is by wearing the proper safety equipment; lack of these may get you injured. Equipment such as earplugs, earmuffs, safety goggles, hard hats, gloves, or a full-face mask is recommended for specific jobs and can help reduce the risk of workplace injury associated with such jobs.

The business owner and facility manager must educate their employees on workplace safety efforts and encourage the workers to be active players in the process. By encouraging your employees to think and practice safety, you’ll control costs with reduced injuries. You’ll also reduce insurance costs.

And if you need to review your risk profile and get advice on managing risk costs, contact us anytime!

 

Managing Occupational Stress

Stress is present in nearly any workplace. Daily challenges, deadlines, overtime and more can create short-term stress. For many, this short-term stress can evolve into harmful, long-term occupational stress. For an increasing number of Americans, long-term occupational stress poses serious risks to their mental, physical, and emotional well being.

Several studies by the American Psychological Association (APA) support this. In a 2012 study on stress, 65% of respondents reported their occupation as a leading cause of stress. A 2013 survey by the same organization found chronic occupational stress affected over a third of those surveyed. In both surveys, respondents reported lacking sufficient personal and professional resources for coping with stress.

For most people suffering from occupational stress, the stress and worry follow them home. Physical symptoms such as nausea, hyperventilating, anxiety and more can affect sleep patterns, diet, and much more. Over time, this can take a heavy toll on the body and immune system. Compounding the effects, many choose to self-medicate with alcohol, cigarettes, overeating or other mechanisms. These can lead to other health complications.

While it may be impossible to avoid workplace stress completely, taking steps to better manage occupational stress is. Learn how to identify and manage stress to reduce the impact of stress, and improve health.

Identifying Occupational Stressors

Occupations vary across the board yet many share similar causes of stress. These can include:

  • Feeling a lack of control in the workplace
  • Insufficient salary or benefits
  • Volatile workplace
  • High amounts of work
  • Excessive overtime
  • Mundane workload
  • Conflicts with management

From the trades to the tech industry and everywhere between, occupational stress affects people of all ages.

Managing Occupational Stress

After spotting the causes of workplace stress, taking steps to manage stress may be easier. Knowing the root cause of stress can help with managing the related symptoms, and can help with removing the cause completely.

  • Keep a journal. Keeping a record of stress-causing situations can help establish patterns. Over two weeks, record stressful experiences in the workplace. Include the persons involved, the scenario, and your own response. Also, include the effect the stress had on the remainder of the day both at work and at home. With a record, it may be possible to find patterns and establish healthy coping mechanisms.
  • Establish healthy coping mechanisms. For many people, the immediate response to stress may be a cigarette, cheeseburger, or a beer after work. The next time stress becomes a bear, try a healthier alternative. Walking, stretching, and practically all physical exercise can help reduce stress. For others, the right coping mechanism may be pursuing a hobby or favorite activity. Getting the mind on something else can help reduce stress and anxiety while keeping the body healthy.
  • Create communications boundaries. This can be one of the most challenging to accomplish. The benefit of smartphones is balanced by an unbroken tether to the workplace. It can be challenging for both employees and employers to keep communication to established working hours. The right balance will depend on the person and profession yet setting schedules for checking email and other correspondence can help alleviate a great deal of occupational stress.
  • Take personal time. Oftentimes, ambition and capability are greatly mismatched. Many experience occupational stress by working too hard, or too much. To help reduce stress and stay physically charged, take personal time. This can be in the form of vacation, a weekend, or simply disconnecting for the evening. A break can perform wonders for energy levels.
  • Speak to a someone. Most supervisors want their employees feeling healthy and motivated. If workplace stress is taking a toll, speak to a supervisor for possible solutions. This can be creating strategies for avoiding or coping with stress, or other resources the company may have access to such as counseling, or an Employee Assistance Program. A good supervisor should appreciate proactive, personal care and be willing to help overcome these challenges.

The first step in overcoming occupational stress is recognizing it. Stress can feel like a large, immovable boulder yet with the right tools, it’s possible to manage and overcome. Check with us often for more on tips for living a healthier life.

WS – Managing Workplace Stress

Feeling a little frazzled at work? You’ve got company. Americans are dealing with increasing levels of stress in the workplace at the cost of their health. Some of it makes sense; after all, we’ve got a reputation for being workaholics. Of all those offered vacation days each year, only around half report taking any. Many employees also work weekends and overtime on a regular basis, leaving little time for decompression.

A 2014 study spearheaded by NPR revealed over half of American employees suffer from occupational stress in a given year. Of those, 1 in 5 reported suffering a great deal of stress. Occupational stress follows you home. Office anxiety can affect the body and mind at all hours.

The Top Causes of Occupational Stress

The study highlights a number of stressors common in the workplace. While these represent those occurring most, there are a large number of potential stressors to elude. The most common causes of occupational stress listed in the study are:

  • Occupational effects on personal health
  • Safety hazards in the workplace
  • Insufficient wages/Excessive Workload
  • Unmet benefits demands

The list goes on but it’s clear overwork and under-appreciation rank high. Excessive stress can manifest physically through insomnia, high blood pressure, and a reduced capability to fight illness. High-stress levels are linked to anxiety levels and fluctuations in weight, leading to further complications. Before succumbing to occupational stress, take steps to manage workplace stress.

Managing Occupational Stress

Many management techniques are available to help reduce and eliminate stress. The right combination will depend on the individual. For some, there may be multiple stressors to manage. Tips for managing occupational stress include:

1. Find the source. Stress will be easier to manage once the stressors have been established. Personal methods may vary but experts recommend recording stressors over several weeks. What happened, your reaction, who was there and how you responded will all help in creating a record.

2. Choose healthy methods for coping. There are many ways to relieve stress and remain healthy. Exercise, reading, yoga, and meditation are just a sample of activities to get your mind off work.

3. Create boundary lines. Today, the lines between work and home are getting blurry. If work intrudes on your personal time, set times to ignore devices and decompress.

4. Remember personal time. While setting boundaries, remember to leave time for yourself. Half of the American workforce is leaving vacation time on the table. Take a vacation and relax a little.

5. Speak to a manager. If the stress continues to be an issue, speak to a manager. Good supervisors want to know if their team has an issue. Sharing concerns about workplace stress can lead to improvements.

6. Find a support structure. Some companies have employee assistance programs for supporting staff. For others, community and family may be the right solution. Overwhelmed? Speak to your physician or contact a psychologist.

Fight back. Learn how to spot, manage, and eliminate workplace stress to support living a happy and healthy life.

Place Safety First and Avoid Injuries in the Workplace

This past year, employees across the nation suffered debilitating injuries in the workplace. For many, injuries led to amputation and permanent disability. For other, their injuries led to death. After any workplace accident, questions arise about fault, and if future accidents are preventable. In the worst cases, companies place profits above people with often disastrous consequences.

A recently published study in the Journal of Accounting and Economics highlights the correlation between profit and injury. Utilizing OSHA statistics and earnings information, the results are a bit unsettling. For companies meeting or slightly-beating earnings forecasts, the impact on staff is the most significant.

Employment illness rates for firms with stressful quotas increase by 5-15%. Firms falling below expectations had high percentages of affected staff as well. On average, for companies just meeting earnings goals, approximately 1 in 24 employees will fall ill or become injured. For companies falling below, the ratio is only slightly less-alarming at 1 in 27.

According to the study, this is largely thanks to two main contributing factors:

  • First, in firms striving to meet earnings goals employees often shoulder larger workloads to meet expectations.
  • Second, firms may cut corners on safety and wellness measures to meet goals.

Managers pressured to perform often pass stress along to their teams. This can include longer hours, increased workloads, and more. A fatigued staff is often more prone to illness or injury. Maintenance of machinery and other equipment, safety training, and other welfare measures are oft overlooked in exchange for short-term earnings.

Several standout figures emerged from the study:

  • Companies with union labor tend to have better safety records than others. This is largely a result of negotiated safety equipment, workload, and schedules. There is speculation that union employees may feel more comfortable addressing safety matters as well.
  • Workers compensation rates may motivate companies to be safer. The study found that companies operating in states with high workers compensation rates tended to have a reduced number of workplace injuries. It’s theorized this is a result of companies employing better safety measures to reduce claims expense.
  • Companies contracted by state or federal agencies scored higher for safety. This is likely due to government standards necessary for placing bids.

The study represents reported workplace injuries. It’s quite likely a large number of workplace accidents go unreported each year. In some cases, management creates a hostile environment. Other times, employees may be in fear of reprisal or termination. For many companies profits take precedence.

When companies sacrifice safety standards any short-term financial gains will be forfeited. An injury or death in the workplace, beyond the obvious tragedy, can have a significant impact on a business. Damaged reputation, insurance claims, and lengthy legal battles are the tip of the iceberg. Safety is always the best choice. If you own a business, practice safety and get protection. Call an agent for more information about commercial insurance and liability protection through GR Little.

Overcoming Digital Eyestrain

The modern world is damaging eyes. Prolonged exposure to computer screens, phones, tablets and other digital devices can damage vision. The Vision Council estimates 83% of Americans spend 2 or more hours per day on a digital device. For many, this can be alleviated by limiting time spent on phones and e-readers yet for the average office employee, that may be a bit of a challenge. The American Optometry Association concluded the average American spends up to 7 hours per day looking at a computer screen.

Today over two-thirds of Americans report symptoms of Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS). Also referred to as digital eyestrain, CVS includes painful short- and long-term symptoms such as:

  • Neck and shoulder strain
  • Blurred and interrupted vision
  • Migraine headaches
  • Lost vision and more

Proximity to the screen, ambient lighting, and screen brightness can also contribute to CVS. The American Optometry Association warns of further complications should symptoms go untreated.

Approaching Digital Eyestrain

There are several steps to take that may help reduce the risk for developing Computer Vision Syndrome:

  • Maintain an upright posture while viewing screens
  • If prescribed corrective lenses, be sure to wear them
  • Position device screens approximately 2 feet from the eyes
  • Employ effective lighting to minimizes screen glare
  • Look away from screens at 20-minute intervals for 20 seconds
  • Reduce fatigue and dry eye by blinking often

A comprehensive eye exam can help detect signs of digital eyestrain. A medical professional can make recommendations for individual treatment solutions.

Check back often for more health and insurance information for getting the most from life. For questions about insurance, contact an agent today.